Authors

Pierre Jarrige, Nicolas Ticaud, Sophie Kohler, Rodney P. O’Connor, Lionel Duvillaret, Gwenael Gaborit, Delia Arnaud-Cormos, Member, IEEE, and Philippe Leveque, Member, IEEE

Abstract

In this paper, we present radio-frequency electromagnetic field characterization of an electrooptic (EO) probe. This probe is able to simultaneously measure temperature and one component of the electric field (e-field) in a continuous wave (CW) or in a pulsed regime. For this purpose, linearity, selectivity, and sensitivity measurements are performed in air and in a cuvette filled with a water solution. The media are exposed to 1800-MHz CW electromagnetic wave through a transverse electromagnetic cell. Numerical characterization is also performed using finite difference time-domain simulations. The EO probe presents a dynamic range exceeding 70 dB. Selectivity up to 25 dB is measured, demonstrating the ability of the EO probe to measure one unique component of the e-field. The EO probe sensitivity is equal to 0.77 and to 0.18 V · m-¹ Hz−¹⁄², in the air and in the water solution, respectively. This millimeter-sized EO probe is particularly suited for the measurement of ultrawide bandwidth and high-voltage e-fields up to a few megavolts per meter.

Introduction

To assess the potential effects of RF electromagnetic fields on human health, electric-field (E-field) probes and temperature probes are extensively used [1]–[3]. Indeed, the interaction between time-varying electromagnetic fields and biological systems such as tissues or cells can be quantified from the temperature rise or the E-field induced in the exposed medium. More precisely, the standard parameter for assessing the interaction, namely, the power absorbed by the medium, is the specific absorption rate (SAR) [4]–[7]. For experimental SAR assessment via E-field measurements, two types of E-field probes are basically used: metal-based probes such as diodeloaded dipole sensors and electrooptic (EO) probes [1], [6], [8]–[11]. Due to their fully dielectric structure and small size, EO probes are much less invasive than metal-based electromagnetic field probes…

Reference

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INSTRUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT, VOL. 61, NO. 7, JULY 2012

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